The Best Mac Virus Scan Software

Mac Virus Scan

In this guide we intend to help you decide what the best antivirus for your Mac is and whether it needs one or not. We tested six antivirus programs and analyzed the best and the worst features they have to offer. Our goal is to tell you the best Mac virus scan software currently available.

Do I Really Need a Mac Virus Scan Software?

It has been said that Macs are secure and essentially invulnerable to viruses. On the other hand, it has also been said that Macs, like any other computers connected to the internet, are a target to malware and cyber-attacks.

The truth lies somewhere in between these two statements, however. Macs are certainly not invulnerable to all cyber-attacks and thinking that they are indeed immune is very dangerous. As such, owning a Mac virus scan software is very important. It is true that the Mac OS X is far from being the number one target of criminals as virus developers are more interested in infecting and controlling computers for profit. So these developers focus more on platforms that are used by a wider audience and that are more vulnerable and less secure, such as Windows PCs and Android mobile phones.

OS X is a lot more difficult to hack and cybercriminals know this. The operating system is based on UNIX which means that there are various securities already built in it, like the way the data and executable code are stored inside the system in different folders. This is also what makes uninstalling software on a Mac so much easier.

However, malware for OS X, even though in limited number, does exist, despite the fact that Macs are a lot safer from internet attacks and viruses than PCs. Don’t make the mistake of thinking your Mac is entirely safe from malware.

We analyzed six of the most known and best antivirus for Mac and we will present you with short reviews that will help you decide which program offers the best protection for your computer.

Avira Antivirus for Mac

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Avira for Mac is a very capable antivirus suite that doesn’t slow the Mac as much as other antivirus software. On top of this, the family-owned German company doesn’t seem to be monetizing on its freemium model by forcing the user to purchase additional data for the antivirus.

Price: Free

Avast Antivirus for Mac

avast-antivirus-for-mac

The Avast antivirus for Mac is free and provides appropriate protection against malware for your computer. Avast does a great job in monitoring Mac malware but our tests show that it can slow down your computer when the software is running in the background.

Price: Free for non-commercial use

ESET Cyber Security for Mac

eset-cyber-security-for-mac

The Cyber Security suite from ESET is perfect for users that wish to optimize and tweak their Macs. It also offers great malware detection and a very complex security app.

Price: $39.99 / year for one Mac

ClamXav 2 Antivirus for Mac

clamxav2-antivirus-for-mac

This antivirus software works really well and is constantly being updated by its developer. Even though it was the slowest in scans, the software doesn’t have a real time component that will slow down your day to day work on the computer.

Price: Free

Intego Internet Security for Mac

intego-internet-security-for-mac

Mac Internet Security from Intego is very simple to install and causes minimal slow-down on your Mac. It is also the software that scored the highest in our tests.

Price: $39.99 / year for one Mac

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac

kaspersky-internet-security-for-mac

The Internet Security for Mac from developer Kaspersky provides adequate performance but tends to be a bit unstable. Despite being fairly capable, there are much better and cheaper alternatives out there.

Price: $59.95 / year for one Mac

Out of the six antivirus programs we’ve tested, Kaspersky was the most disappointing one and our two favorites were Intego’s Mac Internet Security and ESET’s Cyber Security. We hope our guide helped you decide which the best antivirus software for you is. Thank you for reading.

Images source: macworld.co.uk